ABOUT PROJECT

building stm with qns


Scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) are tools for imaging conductive surfaces at the nanometer (0.0000001 cm) scale on surfaces. With mechanisms similar to a record player, STM utilizes the 'quantum tunneling’ effect which occurs between the ultra fine STM tip and the surface when electric charge is applied. The topography of the sample is obtained by moving the STM tip over the surface and measuring the tunneling current in a way that is similar to reading Braille. If you want to know more about STM please watch spoken language gcse essay example lipitor fatique headaches examples of attention getters in essays what is a academic paper click here 20 page essay science report sample follow levitra holcombe go order synthroid online without a prescription presentation person get link go source url https://nebraskaortho.com/docmed/viagra-user-reviews/73/ list of legitimate canadian pharmacies cialis trouble swallowing ozomen tablet cost viagra comment s en procurer viagra versus cialis which is better https://home.freshwater.uwm.edu/termpaper/accounting-experience-on-resume/7/ go to link https://www.nationalautismcenter.org/letter/quality-management-assignment/26/ religion thesis statement social work thesis pdf how can i buy viagra in toronto ontario viagra india buy online how can i find my ipad mini version https://greenechamber.org/blog/resume-templates-administrative/74/ value of college education essay buy best quality of minocycline the video on our YouTube Channel.

Our electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope (ESR-STM) machines are capable of measuring and manipulating single atoms and their spin states. Such extreme sensitivity is achievable at cryogenic temperatures (-150° to -273° Celsius!) and in a low vibration environment. We study and optimize each part of the system in order to build our own instruments that outperform comparable commercial machines. This project aims to introduce the key components of our machines and explain their importance.

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